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The problem with these systems was that you had to heat to
create temperature and then cool to create a vacuum. Thus,
most of the steam's energy was used to get lost. This detail was noticed by a Scottish engineer, James Watt. He
found a way out of this problem and thus initiated the
industrial revolution. Watt introduced some improvements to
some existing machines that made poor use of steam power,
which was key. One consisted of a metal rod connecting the
piston to a wheel.
Thus, a back and forth movement was transformed into a
circular movement. But the best part was adding a space for
the vapor to condense. By then, the cylinder where everything
happens has been heating up and cooling down, wasting time
and efficiency. The separation allowed James Watt to keep the
steam engine working at the same temperature. This
multiplied the efficiency and made it fully effective. These wheels, turning, propelled by the power of steam, began
to move things: locomotives, looms, pumps, ship's wheels, and
indeed all nascent European industry and later global industry.
For a long time, people used animals first, and then the power
of water and wind. But this was the first time they manipulated
matter and turned water into vapor for energy.
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Highlights

From the Editor - Ruchika Rawan

From the Editor - Ruchika Rawan

The Inventions that have changed the world

The Inventions that have changed the world

‘The War of Currents’ 
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